National and international collaborations

International collaboration

Sweden summer school 2017The Centre for Disability Studies has wide ranging international collaboration with scholars, research institutions and universities in the Nordic countries as well as in a number of other European countries, Canada, the United States and Australia. Collaboration with advocacy groups, disabled people’s organizations, policy makers, service providers, local and national governments is also an important aspect of the Centre’s work.

International research collaborators include Stockholm University (Sweden), NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway), Centre for Disability Studies at Leeds University (UK), University of Sheffield (UK), Centre for Disability Law and Policy (National University of Ireland, Galway), Norah Fry Research Centre (University of Bristol, UK), University of Swansea (Wales, UK), University of Toronto (Canada), Western University (Canada), University of Alberta (Canada), Centre on Human Policy, Law and Disability Studies (Syracuse University, USA), Montclair State University (USA), Deakin University (Geelong, Australia), and Centre for Disability Research and Policy, Sydney University (Australia).

Important aspect of the Centre’s activities is collaboration with advocacy groups, disabled people’s organizations, policy makers, service providers, local and national governments. 

International collaboration with disabled people‘s organisations include Independent Living Institute in Stockholm https://www.independentliving.org/ and The Swedish Disability Rights Federation (Funtionsrätt Sverige) https://funktionsratt.se/om-oss/in-english/ and European Network on Independent Living https://enil.eu/

European wide Collaboration. The Centre has also collaborated, through various projects, with EDF, the European Disability Forum http://www.edf-feph.org/ and EASPD, European Association of Service Providers for Persons with disabilities http://www.easpd.eu/.

Nordic level collaboration on policy making. Over many years the Centre has collaborated with the Nordic Welfare Centre http://www.npa.is/ This work has, in particular, focused on disability issues https://nordicwelfare.org/en/disability-issues/. The Nordic Welfare Centre is an institution under the Nordic Council of Ministers https://www.norden.org/en and disseminates knowledge on welfare issues to all the Nordic countries in order to strengthen tools for policy-making and well-being all citizens.

National collaboration

Skerðingarspilið afhentImportant aspect of the Centre’s activities is collaboration with national advocacy and activist groups, disabled people’s organizations, policy makers, service providers, local and national governments. 

Disabled People’s organisations. The collaboration with disabled people‘s organisations and activist groups in Iceland are at the core of the Centre’s activities. Since its foundation the Centre has worked closely in advocating disability human rights with a wide range of disabled people‘s organisations in Iceland including The Organisation of Disabled People in Iceland https://www.obi.is/is/english, The National Association of Intellectual Disabilities https://www.throskahjalp.is/is/samtokin/english, TABÚ, Feminist Disability Activist Group http://tabu.is/category/english/, Átak, Félag fólks með þroskahömlun (The Icelandic Self-Advocacy Group) http://www.lesa.is/ and NPA Miðstöðin (The Centre for Independent Living) http://www.npa.is/. Members of the Centre also work with informal groups of disabled people such as a long-term collaborative work with a group of parents with intellectual disabilities.

Policy-making. The Centre has worked both independently and in collaboration with DPOs on advising Ministries and Alþingi (the Icelandic Parliament) on disability law and policy.

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